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American-Hawaiian Steamship Co., Founded 1899.

Freighter. 4,409 tons

American Hawaiian Steamship Company.

This line was not a passenger line; however, it was the largest single fleet of freighters under the American flag during its years of operation, with trade between the Atlantic and Pacific coasts and the Territory of Hawaii. When the United States entered World War I in the spring of 1917, about 25 per cent of the deadweight tonnage of large sea-going freighters under U. S. registry was owned by American-Hawaiian. The American-Hawaiian Steamship Company carried cargos of sugar from Hawaii to the United States and manufactured goods back to Hawaii.

October 27, 1901, New York Times, New York City, New York, U.S.A.

PHILADELPHIA, Penn., Oct. 26. -- It was reported to-day in maritime circles that an arrangement has been effected between the Panama Railroad Company and the American-Hawaiian Steamship Company, now plying between New York and Philadelphia and San Francisco and the Hawaiian Islands, by which the cargoes will be transferred at the Isthmus to the railroad.

October 12, 1902

Nebraskan Arrives.

The freighter Nebraskan, Captain Delano, arrived yesterday, 65 days from New York and two days from San Diego. She brought a large cargo and reports as uneventful passage.

December 17, 1902, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

ALBATROSS HAS A NARROW ESCAPE IN COLLISION WITH NEBRASKAN 
Strong Ebb Tide Sweeps Freighter Against Government Vessel Which Sustains Damage Estimated at About $2000

THE strong ebb tide of yesterday afternoon swept the big freighter Nebraskan against the United States Fish Commission steamship Albatross and damaged the Government boat to the extent of about $2000.

The Nebraskan had left her dock at Sleuart-street wharf and her skipper, Captain Greene, was trying to get his vessel straightened out for the Golden Gate when the accident happened. The tide was exceptionally high yesterday and at 4 o'clock, when the Nebraskan left her dock, was running out with terrific force.

As the Nebraskan backed into the stream the tide carried her down until she was opposite Folsom street, but still headfny toward Mission Bay. Captain Gieene got headway on his vessel and after passing the Albatross, which is anchored off Harrison street, steered a course across the bow of the Fish Commission vessel. Out where the Albatross lay the tide was running considerably swifter than it was inshore and if Captain Greene did not notice this he was the only navigator in that part of the bay that overlooked it and failed to make proper allowance.

The Nebraskan was swept against the Albatross and but for the prompt action of those aboard the Government craft in giving their vessel more chain the United States Fish Commission would have lost a most, valuable ship. As it was, the big freighter snapped off the bowsprit of the Albatross and with all the force of her enormous weight tore through all obstructions attached to and projecting from the starboard side of the anchored vessel. A wherry hanging on the forward davits was badly shattered and the iron davits were strained and twisted beyond repair. The first cutter, lying at the boom, was smashed to matchwood and the starboard gangway reduced to a pulp.

Nobody was hurt and the Nebraskan saved from injury by the stoutness of her lofty steel side, proceeded on her way to Honolulu. On the Albatross they deplore the accident, estimate the damage at $2000 and express the "wish that the Nebraskan had tackled something nearer her size; had tried, for instance, to cross the bow of the battleship Wisconsin, which was all ready to receive runaway freighters just a little farther down the bay.

Captain Greene was only recently promoted to the command of the Nebraskan. The damage to theAlbatross will be paid for by the American-Hawaiian Steamship Company, which will collect three-quarters of the amount from the underwriters.

June 2, 1903, Los Angeles Herald, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.

Pilot Returns Home

SAN FRANCISCO, June I. Captain G. Wallace, the pilot who was taken to sea on the steamerSonoma because of the rough weather outside the Golden Gate, returned from Honolulu today on the steamer Nebraskan.

June 11, 1904, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

NEBRASKAN SHOWS PRACTICABILITY OF LIQUID FUEL FOR LONG VOYAGES

American-Hawaiian Steamship Company's Freighter, Recently Converted Into an Oil Burner, Makes the 13,150 Mile Run From New York to This Port Without Replenishing Tanks

The American-Hawaiian Steamship Company's freighter Nebraskan, Captain Weeden, surprised the shipping world yesterday by plowing in through the Golden Gate, fifty-four days from New York, and three or four days before she was looked for. The Nebraskan, before leaving here, was converted into an oil burner and has demonstrated the practicability of liquid fuel for very long voyages. The Oceanic Steamship Company was the first on this coast to demonstrate the value of oil as fuel for ocean-going steamers and the oil-burning liner Mariposa has for many months been running between here and Tahiti with the regularity of clockwork.

The Mariposa's round trip is only about 7480 miles, however, and in spite of her good showing there remained many who doubted the practicability of liquid fuel on longer runs. The objection to attempting the New York to San Francisco run with an oil-burner was the absence of supply stations along the route. The Nebraskan has proved that supply stations are not necessary. The course from New York to San Francisco, as taken by the Nebraskan is 13,150 miles, or nearly twice as long as the distance traveled by the Mariposa in making the round trip to Tahiti.

The Nebraskan left New York with enough fuel to bring her all the way to San Francisco and in addition carried a cargo of 5000 tons of general merchandise. She made only one stop on the entire run and that was in the Straits of Magellan and necessitated by the weather. From the river Platte to the straits the Nebraskan bucked a continuous gale, but made good headway in spite of it. The Nebraskan's run was watched with special interest by the naval authorities and the success of the experiment will do much toward awakening official interest in the modern fuel.

The Nebraskan's actual steaming time was fifty-two days ten hours, which is one of the smartest passages ever made by the vessels of this line.

March 23, 1903, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

NEBRASKAN HAS STORMY VOYAGE 
Battles With a Terrific Southeaster Twenty Eight Hours.

The American-Hawaiian Steamship Company's freighter Nebraskan, which arrived from Honolulu late on Saturday night and was yesterday released from quarantine, encountered a spell of most terrific weather when in longitude 135 west. A southeasterly gale of unusual violence blew for twenty-eight hours, and the Nebraskan, monster as she is, was rocked and tumbled about like a cork. Big seas swept over the freighter find little headway was made in the direction of San Francisco as long as the storm raged. She came up In seven days, twenty-one hours. Her cargo included 55,792 bags of sugar and 652 bunches of bananas. She also brought up Hawaiian money valued at $40,000.

July 7, 1903, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

Nebraskan Meets Heavy Weather

The American-Hawaiian Steamship Company's Nebraskan, which arrived yesterday from Honolulu, encountered heavy weather throughout the voyage. Her cargo consisted of 42,446 bags of sugar, 213 tons of scrap iron and 44 tons of general merchandise.

March 28, 1904, Los Angeles Herald, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.

BURNED OIL ON TRIP AROUND HORN 
Successful Test of the Nebraskan

NEW YORK, March 27. The American-Hawaiian line steamer Nebraskan arrived today from San Francisco and San Diego, with a large cargo of wine, etc. The Nebraskan is fitted with an equipment to burn oil as fuel. She left San Francisco January 23 and used the oil continuously and successfully throughout the voyage, enabling her to steam direct to New York without making the usual stops at coal ports. The Nebraskan left San Francisco with two tons of coal on board.

Nebraskan-Freighter-1904

June 11, 1904, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

NEBRASKAN Shows Practicability of Liquid Fuel for Long Voyages

American-Hawaiian Steamship Company's Freighter, Recently Converted Into an Oil Burner, Makes the 13,150 Mile Run From New York to This Port Without Replenishing Tanks

The American-Hawaiian Steamship Company's freighter Nebraskan, Captain Weeden, surprised the shipping world yesterday by plowing in through the Golden Gate, fifty-four days from New York, and three or four days before she was looked for.

The Nebraskan, before leaving here, was converted into an oil burner and has demonstrated the practicability of liquid fuel for very long voyages. The Oceanic Steamship Company was the first on this coast to demonstrate the value of oil as fuel for ocean-going steamers and the oil-burning liner Mariposa has for many months been running between here and Tahiti with the regularity of clockwork.

Container Shipping.Container shipping. The Marlposa's round trip is only about 7400 miles, however, and in spite of her good showing there remained many who doubted the practicability of liquid fuel on longer runs. The objection to attempting the New York to San Francisco run with an oil-burner was the absence of supply stations along the route. The Nebraskan has proved that supply stations are not necessary. The course from New York to San Francisco, as taken by the Nebraskan is 13,150 miles, or nearly twice as long as the distance traveled by the Mariposa in making the round trip to Tahiti.

The Nebraskan left New York with enough fuel to bring her all the way to San Francisco and in addition carried a cargo of 5000 tons of general merchandise. She made only one stop on the entire run and that was in the Straits of Magellan and necessitated by the weather. From the river Platte to the straits the Nebraskan bucked a continuous gale, but made good headway in spite of it.

The Nebraskan's run was watched with special interest by the naval authorities and the success of the experiment will do much toward awakening official interest in the modern fuel.

The Nebraskan's actual steaming time was fifty-two days ten hours, which is one of the smartest passages ever made by the vessels of this line.

June 12, 1904, Los Angeles Herald, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.

OIL BURNING STEAMER MAKES TRIP AROUND HORN

SAN FRANCISCO, June 11. Nine thousand six hundred and thirty-four barrels of oil were consumed as fuel in bringing the freight steamer Nebraskan to port from New York. The trip occupied fifty-two days and ten hours. The oil burning appliances were never out of order. This is looked upon as remarkable, in view of the fact that the voyage of the Nebraskan is tho longest ever dependent wholly upon oil for fuel.

October 30, 1904, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

The Nebraskan Safe.

In the accounts of the great water front fire in Brooklyn Thursday, October 28. it was announced that the American-Hawaiian steamships American, Arizonian and Nebraskan were among the vessels destroyed. A later dispatch reports that the American and Arizonian had escaped the flames, but no mention was made of the Nebraskan. It is now known, however, that that splendid ship sailed from New York for San Francisco October 15 and is far down the Atlantic by this time.

June 25, 1909, Los Angeles Herald, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.

STEAMSHIP LINE TO BE IMPROVED 
LOS ANGELES IS BENEFITED BY INNOVATION 
Boat Riverside of American-Hawaiian Service to Ply Exclusively Between San Diego and Mexico, Saving Time

The rapid growth of its California service has impelled the American Hawaiian line to add a new steamer in the service between Salina Cruz and San Diego, which will be of special benefit to Los Angeles. In addition to the Navadan and the Nebraskan, a third steamer, the Riverside, is in the company's coastwise service, but consignments will not be handled by the new steamer farther north than Los Angeles.

This will be of considerable benefit to Southern California patrons, for it will not be necessary for outward shipments from Los Angeles via the American-Hawaiian line to be taken north to Seattle, as has been the case. Goods to be shipped from Los Angeles to New York will be taken by theRiverside direct to the Tehuantepec route, effecting a considerable saving of time.

The Riverside's first voyage in the coastwise service will bring her to San Diego July 18. Her advent means that the company will have a steamer out of San Diego every eleven days thereafter, and the sailing time to New York will have a minimum of twenty five days with not more than a week over that at the most.

New Schedule

The new coastwise schedule, which will be distributed among Los Angeles merchants by J. B. Alexander, local agent of the American-Hawaiian line, gives the following arrivals at San Diego, sailings being three days later in each case:

  • Nevadan, July 7; arrival at Salina Cruz, August 4.
  • Riverside, July 18; arrival at Salina Cruz. July 28.
  • Nebraskan. July 28; arrival at Salina Cruz, August 25.
  • Riverside, August 8; arrival at Salina Cruz. August 18.
  • Nevadan, August 18: arrival at Salina, Cruz, September 15.
  • Riverside, August 29: arrival at salina Cruz. September 9.
  • Nebraskan, September 8; arrival at Salina Cruz, October 26.
  • Riverside, September 19: arrival at Salina Cruz, September 29.
  • Nevadan, September 29; arrival at Salina Cruz. October 27.

The addition of the Riverside and its reservation for the Southern California trade alone is a testimonial to the growth of this trade as handled by the Spreckels boats. The bulk of this is to and from Los Angeles.

Customers Pleased

"Our Los Angeles customers to whom I have shown the copy of the new schedule are greatly pleased with the innovation," said Mr. Alexander yesterday. "It not only means more expeditious handling of shipments from New York and elsewhere across the isthmus, but will likewise stimulate the trade eastbound from this city.

"We have a shipment, as an instance, of 600 barrels of California wine from a local customer to go to New York Under the new arrangement this may be handled more expeditiously and will be unloaded In New York in much quicker time than has heretofore been the case.

June 28, 1909, Los Angeles Herald, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.

LARGE HAWAIIAN CARGO DISCHARGED AT SAN DIEGO

Steamer Nebraskan of the American Hawaiian Line Brings Record Consignment to Port

SAN DIEGO, June 27. The American-Hawaiian steamer Nebraskan arrived in port today from Salina Cruz. Of her cargo, which is a large one, 3300 tons will be discharged here. This is the largest cargo consigned to this port that has ever been brought by a steamer of this line.

After discharging here the Nebraskan will proceed to San Francsico with the remainder of her cargo.

June 26, 1911, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

GANG OF HIGHWAYMEN ROBS TWO PEDESTRIANS 
One Victim Badly Beaten With Brass Knuckles

James Papas, a sailor on the steamer Nebraskan, was beaten and robbed by five thugs yesterday morning while he was walking in South park. One of the men beat Papas into unconsciousness with brass knuckles and the other four took $5 and a watch. Papas was found by a patrolman and taken to the Harbor hospital, where a severe laceration on the back of his head was treated by Doctor Skoonberg. He was able to go to his home later.

NEBRASKAN BRINGS GREETINGS TO CITY

First Cargo Ship Through the Panama Canal Loaded with West Coast Products. 
CAPTAIN VISITS CITY HALL 
Received by the Acting Mayor and City Officials, Who Are Afterward Entertained on His Ship.

Capt. George Knight of the steamship Nebraskan, the first ship to carry a cargo of California products from San Francisco to this city by the Panama Canal route, called upon Acting Mayor George McAneny at the City Hall yesterday and was warmly received by Mr. McAneny and a committee of city officials, business, men and army and navy officers.

May 20, 1912, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

TEHUANTEPEC IS STILL SAFE ROUTE 
Nebraskan Arrives Ahead of Time From Isthmus With Eastern Merchandise

Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Mexico, 1885.

ALTHOUGH the turbulent state of affairs in Mexico has made itself felt upon southern shipping to some extent, cargoes from the eastern manufacturing centers for this coast are coming through on schedule time via the Tehuantepec route. The American - Hawaiian steamer Nebraskan, Captain Knight, which arrived yesterday from Salina Cruz with a cargo of eastern merchandise shipped via the route, came into port a day ahead of time. The extra time was gained through the facilities afforded for transferring the cargo. The Nebraskan enjoyed fine weather on the trip up the coast. No refugees were taken aboard. According to the officers of the vessel, the persons who feared injury at the hands of revolutionists now believe that the visit of the transport Buford has exerted a salutary influence. (Right: Gulf of Tehuantepec.)

The Nebraskan brought the wife and the mother of Paymaster Lawton of the Tehauntepec railroad.

July 10, 1912, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

Astoria: The American-Hawaiian steamer Nebraskan, Captain G. B. Knight, arrived at 1:40 o'clock this morning from Salina Cruz, via San Diego and San Francisco with 1,100 tons of merchandise from New York. When the Nebraskan sails again Friday for Salina Cruz via the Golden Gate, it will have a shipment of lumber and one of shingles for New York, as well as miscellaneous freight.

July 19, 1912, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

NEWS OF THE OCEAN 
Exports by the Nebraskan

The steamer Nebraskan sailed for Salina Cruz Wednesday wlth cargo laden here and at other coast ports, consigned principally to New York and to European countires, via Tehuantepec railway. The cargo laden here was valued at $550,572, the distribution being as follows: For New York, $454,784; England, $40,737; Germany, $86,608; Belgium, $10,541; France $4,046; Holland, $1,680 Mexico, $1,244, Central America, $882. The principal exports and their destinations were as follows:

To New York- 66,221 gals and 179 cs wine; 234 gals brandy; 222,000 lbs raisins, 642,202 lbs beans, 20,861 cs canned goods; 50 cs. honey, 24,710 lbs tea, 29,278 lbs casein, 1, 283,638 lbs wool, 525 flasks quicksilver, 5,456 lbs. old rubber, 1,744 lbs mohair, 4 pkgs machinery, 401 bales hemp, 650,022 lbs copper matte.
To England - 2,810 cs canned fruit, 123,823 lbs scrap copper. 121,805 lbs scrap brass. 
To Germany 456,932 lbs prunes, 2,005 lbs vanilla beans, 22,830 lbs brass propellers, 67,139 lbs scrap brass.
To Belgium 2,445 cs canned goods. 
To France 85,225 lbs prunes. 
To Holland 560 cs canned goods. 
To Mexico 12 pkgs machinery. 
To Central America 1 launch, 5 tanks gasoline.

August 26, 1912, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A, San Francisco, California, U.S.A.

Late Coast Shipping. ASTORIA, August 25: American-Hawaiian steamer Nebraskan, with a large cargo for Atlantic coast points, sailed from here during the night

April 4, 1913, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

Seattle, April 3: Arrived: Steamer Nebraskan

August 23, 1913, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

Sailed Friday, August 22 1:05 p.m., steamer Nebraskan, Wright, Salina Cruz.

Change of Masters: Steamer Nebraskan - G. B. Knight, old master; George Wright, new master

October 4, 1913, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

Departing for New York Sunday, October 5, for New York and Europe via Tehuantepec, steamer Nebraskan, Captain George Wright, at 10 a.m. from Oakland railroad wharf.

December 17, 1913, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, U.S.A

Shipping Intelligence: Due at this port Thursday, December 18: From Salina Cruz, steamer Nebraskan

December 18, 1913, San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California

Arrived 4:45 a.m., steamer Nebraskan, Knight, 11 days from Salina Cruz via San Diego 37 hours; merchandise to Williams, Dimond & Co.

No further notices until:

July 31, 1915, Sausalito News, Sausalito California

A news story indicates that the Nebraskan was destroyed (or damaged), along with the Gulflight, the William P. Frye and the American ship Leelenaw by Germany.

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