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Passengers, Seaports, Captains


San Francisco Gold Rush Years. 1800s.

SS Seabird

Arrive San Francisco

August 1, 1851
Captain Williams
From New York

Passage

Via Bermuda, Pernambico, Rio, Port Famine, Valdivia, Telcahuna, Valparaiso, Payts, Panama, Realejo, Acapulco, Mazatlan, San Diego, and Monterey.

August 1, 1851, Daily Alta California, San Francisco

ARRIVAL OF THE SEA BIRD.--This steamer, Capt. Williams, has at length arrived from New York, after a lengthy passage of 240 days. She brought 74 passengers, a list of whom will be found in another column.

On her way from Panama, the Sea Bird touched at Realejo, and Capt. Williams reports having met there a gentleman who is engaged in business at San Juan del Sud. He was informed by him that the road from San Juan to Lake Nicaragua was already open to mule travel, and that, with the exception of two or three bridges then under contract, the carriage road was completed. He also reported that the boats destined for the San Juan river had arrived and commenced running. Capt. W. expresses the opinion that the passengers by the Pacific undoubtedly crossed by the Nicaragua route. This is capital news for those concerned in the route, and will be pleasant to those whose friends left yesterday in the Independence.

Memoranda

Per Sea Bird - Left at Callao, Br. Barque Daniel Grant, Br. Barque Julia, barque William Richardson. Ships Niaid and Swallow, Br. Tryphina, at Payat.

The Sea Bird struck on the island of San Martine, and knocked a hole in her larboard bow. She was run on the beach and repaired. The island of San Martine is found to lay 10 miles further north and 15 west of the position given on Imreys chart of 1849.

The Sea Bird is 225 feet long, 45 tons burden, and 110 horse power. She is intended for the river.

Passengers

Allen, B. C. 
Arbdle, Mr. 
Arnold, Mr. 
Bartlett, W. M. 
Barton, Mr. 
Bassett, R. G. 
Beer, J. R. 
Bissel, H. M. 
Bowen, Mr. and lady 
Brien, John D. 
Caldwell, J. 
Cambridge, Mr. 
Cauncey, Mrs. 
Chamberlain, 
Chapman, John 
Chatelain, Mons (Monsieur Chatelain ) 
Clarke, Mr. 
Cole, J. 
Croal, Mr. 
Culver, Mrs. and son 
Davis, Mrs. 
Duncan, D. 
Dunjam, 
Dunply, Mr. 
Eaton, 
Faswell, J. C. 
Flint, E., M. D. 
Harrison, J. 
Hawthorn, 
Hill, Mr. 
Hodge, T.B. 
Huaite, Senor 
Keiley, Jno 
Lane, C. S. 
Marsh, Mr. 
Marshalll, Mr. 
Maurice, Mr. 
McClinton, Mr. 
McClinton, S. 
McCloud, Mrs. and four children 
McGuire, Mr. 
McShane, Mr. 
Mooney, Mr. 
Moore, J. 
Neal, Mr. 
Netatway, C. 
Nourse, C. 
Paniset, Mr. 
Parker, Robt 
Pollard, Mrs. 
Pollard, Mrs. (Two listed, one following the other) 
Price, Mr. 
Randall, A. 
Reid, Mr. 
Riddle, Mrs. 
Segeudre, Mr. 
Shatton, J. 
Siston, Mr. and Mrs. 
Smish, C.F. 
Smish, Miss S. A. 
Smith, H. C. 
Stark, Mr. 
Sweetey, Mr. 
Tonistere, R. 
Treadway, Mr., M. D., and lady 
Urie, Mr. 
Walters, Mr. 
Williams, H. 
Wright, Miss


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Copyright © 1998-2017. All U.S.A. and International Rights Reserved. D. Blethen Adams Levy.

Sources: As noted on entries and through research centers including National Archives, San Bruno, California; San Francisco Main Library History Collection; Maritime Library, San Francisco, California, various Maritime Museums around the world.

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